Style Construction of Machu Picchu

The constructions at Machu Picchu are evidence of the Incas’ extraordinary skill in landscape architecture and drystone walling. Studies show the citadel was built without interruption. The carved stone blocks used in the walls fit together so perfectly  that a pin cannot enter into the crevaces between them. Some of the most inter­esting constructions are […]

The constructions at Machu Picchu are evidence of the Incas’ extraordinary skill in landscape architecture and drystone walling. Studies show the citadel was built without interruption. The carved stone blocks used in the walls fit together so perfectly  that a pin cannot enter into the crevaces between them. Some of the most inter­esting constructions are the Royal Tombs (near the gateway to the citadel), the Temple of the Sun, the Torreon or tower (the only circular structure), the high priests’ mansion, the Temple of the Three Windows, the Central Temple, the Sunken Square and the waterfalls and canals that make up the Inca Baths. The hydraulic canals and staircases, made entirely from stone, are other characteristic elements of the citadel. There are also monoliths of major ritual importance, includ­ing the Intihuatana (‘the hitching post of the sun’ in Quechua), held to be a sundial.

In addition to the archaeological importance of the citadel, Machu Picchu also stands out for the beauty of the surrounding landscape. The exu­berant cloud forest that climbs up the steep hill­sides is a haven for countless species of native flora, including bright orchids, bromeliads and tree-borne ferns. The jungle is also home to the elusive spectacled bear (Tremarctus ornatus), the cock-of-the-rocks (Rupicola peruviana), the quet­zal (Pharomacrus auriceps) and the huemal deer {Pudu mephistopheles). It was not until 1934 that the first road was built from Cuzco to the Machu Picchu inn built that year. In 1981, the government created the Machu Picchu Historic Sanctuary, covering an area of35 5920 Ha, to conserve both the archaeological site and its magnificent natu­ral surroundings.


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